Communication at Center of #TPSER10 Day One Discussions

Helen_Dave_Lead_discussionEach year in Telluride, we kick off the week’s conversation on open and honest communication in medicine by showing the Lewis Blackman Story. For the 10th year in a row, Helen Haskell, Lewis’ mom, was part of the Telluride faculty and for the third year, led the post-film discussion along with Telluride Patient Safety Student and Resident Summer Camp founder, Dave Mayer MD. Many of the resident scholars commented on the various levels of communication failure that occurred during Lewis’ care. Doctor to patient communication, provider to provider communication, power gradient communication challenges–it has been clear for some time that being uncomfortable communicating with anyone in the circle of care to patients puts the patient, and also caregivers, at risk. Lewis’ case is an unfortunate example of what goes terribly wrong when open, honest communication is not valued in a health system.

For those of you who haven’t heard Lewis’ story–he is someone you would have loved to have met. He would be 28 years old this year had his path not crossed that surgical suite almost 14 years ago. An actor, a scholar, an athlete — a lover and friend of the underdog–Lewis was the teen you hoped your kid was hanging out with when you weren’t around. By all accounts, Lewis’ was poised to do wonderful things and he left his mark on life early through his caring, thoughtful nature, a witty sense of humor, a loving son and brother, and now an inspiration to many of us trying to make care safer for patients today. He is one of many who serve as an example of continued and senseless loss in our slow movement toward zero preventable harm in healthcare. We need to decide today, that it’s time to take action in new ways to prevent the same stories from repeating.

For example, what can we do to improve our professional communication skills among healthcare teams so that we ensure families like Lewis’ do not suffer a similar loss? So that good, conscientious caregivers are not put through the traumatic experience of harming a patient out of fear of speaking up in a toxic culture? Which medical education programs are stepping up to incorporate interpersonal communication skill building into their core curriculum from the first day of medical school? Please share best practices in teaching medical and nursing student communication, and start an open conversation about better ways to teach communication to care providers at every level.

 

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Using Twitter to “Live Tweet” a Kidney Transplant @UofUHealthCare

University of Utah Health Care (@UofUHealthCare) pushed the healthcare social media agenda forward yesterday, as well as heightened the bar for transparency in healthcare, as they “live tweeted” a kidney transplant. Not only were they tweeting progress of the surgery, they were posting photos and interacting with the media to answer questions. The team also engaged their patients in this process, even posting photos of the donor in recovery. While I have seen surgeries tweeted in the past, I have not seen anything on this scale, or so inclusive of every person — patient and provider — during the actual delivery of care in such a high-stakes surgery. Kudos to them!

Below is a screen shot of a story aggregated on Storify captured before, during and after the event (click here for full version), but for those interested in, or leading healthcare social media, I highly recommend seeking out @UofUHealthCare’s twitter feed from May 20th, 2014. It provides a textbook lesson in new media and healthcare transparency!

@UofUHealthcare Kidney Transplant

 


Innovations in Healthcare: A Voice for Ex-NFL Player Living with ALS

Healthcare today is a wide open canvas, and technology continues to open doors for entrepreneurs, the tech-savvy young and old from any industry, and those whose immediate need for a solution is far greater than any competing agenda. Steve Gleason, ex-New Orleans Saints football player hit with the same life-altering illness named after the great Lou Gehrig (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS), is getting on with the business of living thanks to a spirit that refuses to quit, a social support network without limits (they carried him to the top of Machu Picchu) and companies like Microsoft. A reminder that the sky really is the limit when the heart and mind remain open.


The Future of Storytelling: The Influence of Fiction on Science

What do Star Trek, Motorola, Stephen Spielberg, Minority Report, Raytheon, @ElonMusk, @JonFavreau, and Iron Man (the movie) have in common? All are examples of how science can influence fiction, and fiction can influence science.

@RobertWong, a graphic designer by training and a driving force behind Google Creative Labs, tells the story of how art, technology & design lovers come together with engineering experts to create the future.  Think Google Glass, cell phones, tricorders and more–What a way to kick off 2014!

For those interested, Wong also hosts a Future of Storytelling Virtual Roundtable Speaker Series weekly on Wednesdays, 12:30pm ET. Click here for more information.


Medical Student Leaders Gather at #AAMC2013

This year’s annual AAMC meeting is in full swing in Philadelphia, and you can join the conversation on Twitter via hashtag #AAMC13 to see highlights. The theme for 2013 is The Change Imperative and the meeting agenda, which runs through Wednesday, includes the following speakers who will without a doubt engage audiences in thought-provoking sessions on what the future of medicine and medical education will look like:

  • Darrell Kirch, AAMC President kicked off plenary sessions Saturday, 4pm to discuss Our Moment of Truth
  • Ian Morrison, Healthcare futurist and author, shared “his perspective on the rapidly changing landscape of health care, the impact of the  Affordable Care Act on academic medicine, and how our community might leverage changes in the marketplace to help shape the future of medicine” on Sunday morning
  • Anna Quindlen, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author, was scheduled for Sunday morning to discuss, Health Care in an Information Age: How Doctors, Nurses and Consumers Can Make One Another Better
  • Daphne Koller, Professor of Computer Science, Stanford University and Co-Founder/Co-CEO, Coursera, discusses Exploring Changes in Education: Is Academic Medicine Ready for MOOCs? (Monday, Nov. 4th, 4pm)
  • Adam Grant, Professor, The Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania and author, Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success, will speak on Embracing Changes in Culture: Driving Organizational Success by Building a Culture of Contributors (Tuesday, Nov. 5th, 4pm)

For final program, click here.

On Tuesday, November 5th, winners of the AAMC “Light-years Beyond Flexner: Academic Medicine in 2033” video contest will also be announced. Medical schools were invited to create a 2-minute video envisioning what US medical schools will look like in 2033. Following is one example from Baylor University who believes three areas of competency physicians of the new age will need to be well versed in are: 1) Network awareness; 2) Information management, and; 3) Digital content creation. Finalists include:

  • Eastern Virginia Medical School
  • Meharry Medical College
  • Temple University School of Medicine

All submissions can be viewed here.


Infectious Innovations in Medical Education

In May of 2012, Chip Heath (Made to Stick) and Charles Prober MD at Stanford University School of Medicine co-authored a NEJM perspective, Lecture Halls Without Lectures–A Proposal for Medical Education, positing that lecture time is wasted time, and that a more dynamic content delivery medium should be explored. Today, Prober and Sal Kahn, of Khan Academy, are now teaming up to experiment with exactly that concept by “flipping” the med school classroom, according to a September 9, 2013 Inside Higher Ed blog post, Flipping Med Ed:

Khan and Prober present a three-step road map: First, identifying a core curriculum with concepts and lessons that can be taught through…short, focused video clips…then, changing static and poorly attended lectures into interactive sessions where students can practice that curriculum; and finally, letting students explore their passion…early on in their med school careers.

As Khan Academy moves toward delivering lessons for medical students, Khan is engaging experts in the field to help create content. He believes that a ratio of 1:299, lecturer to student, only captures the knowledge of one person in the room. When everyone in the classroom is allowed to weigh in, the content, and learning, take on new life. An example of a Khan Academy lesson on antibiotics follows:

Stanford is also working on interactive learning initiatives to support medical educators who would like to explore new ways of delivering traditional curriculum. See more at Stanford Medicine Interactive Learning Initiatives, and stay tuned, as we will continue to share more on the innovations coming your way in medical education.


AMA Awards $11M to Medical Schools Poised to Transform #meded

The American Medical Association (AMA, @AmerMedicalAssn) has announced the final 11 medical schools that will receive funding as part of its Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative. The goal of the initiative is to transform the way future physicians are trained. Following is a short video clip which provides insight into the program.

Here are short summaries of proposals submitted by the winners for innovation in medical education:

Indiana University School of Medicine

The proposal seeks to create a virtual health care system (vHS) and a teaching electronic medical record (tEMR) to teach clinical decision-making and ensure competencies in system, team and population-based health care skills. The tEMR will be a clone of an actual clinical care EMR, populated with panels of patients for students to manage with information gleaned from de-identified actual patient data…(for more information click here)

Mayo Medical School

This proposal will create an innovative educational model based on the science of health care delivery to prepare students to practice within patient-centered, community-oriented, science-driven collaborative care teams that deliver high-value care. The “science of health care delivery” curriculum’s experiential learning program will focus on how interprofessional teams, patients, communities, public health resources and health care delivery systems can impact patient care, health outcomes and cost…(for more information click here)

Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

The proposal will develop and implement a learner-centered, competency-based curriculum that enables medical students to advance through individualized learning plans as they meet pre-determined milestones. A portfolio-based system will track milestone achievement and clinical experiences. Faculty will develop innovative methods for teaching and assessing critically important skills related to informatics, quality science and interprofessional teamwork…(for more information click here)

The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University

The proposal will implement a new comprehensive core curriculum in patient safety for all medical students. The proposal will feature integration with other health-related disciplines to foster interprofessional skills and prepare students to successfully lead health care teams for systems-based health care transformation. One component of the proposal will be a “Teachers of Quality Academy” to help faculty develop the skills necessary to practice and teach this new curriculum(for more information click here)

The following schools are the remaining 7 winners:

  • NYU School of Medicine
  • Penn State College of Medicine
  • The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
  • University of California, Davis School of Medicine
  • University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
  • University of Michigan Medical School
  • Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

From the AMA’s recent press release, it is encouraging to note that of the 141 eligible medical schools, more than 80 percent (119) submitted letters of intent outlining proposals. From their PR department: In March, 28 individual schools and three collaborative groups of schools were selected to submit full proposals before a national advisory panel worked with the AMA to select the final 11 schools. For more information about the initiative, visit www.changemeded.org.

If interested, additional comment and coverage can be found at MedCityNews, What Does the Future of Medical Education Look Like?