Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety Kicks Off in US for 2017

As many of us begin our regular summer pilgrimage to Telluride, Colorado, it is hard to believe that thirteen years have passed since a small group of passionate healthcare leaders came together in Telluride to design a comprehensive patient safety curriculum for future healthcare leaders. As a result of that work, many wonderful and highly committed patient advocates and safety leaders will once again convene in Telluride the next two weeks to continue our mission of Educating the Young. For those not from Colorado, summertime in Telluride may be one of the best kept secrets in the United States. Be it the old west feel of the town, or the hypoxic “magic” that happens at an elevation of 9,500 feet, Telluride has always been an educational mecca for everyone that joins us during these memorable weeks of high altitude learning led by the MedStar Institute for Quality and Safety and the Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety (AELPS).

Over the past thirteen years, about 1,000 students and resident physicians from across the world have attended one of our AELPS Telluride Experience workshops. Many of our past alumni have gone on to lead work that has inspired real change at their home institutions–change that is helping make care safer and more transparent. We look forward to meeting yet another class of emerging patient safety leaders these two weeks who will also stand up for patients, transparency and a true culture of safety during their careers.

Through the generous support of The Doctors Company Foundation (TDCF), Committee of Interns and Residents (CIR), COPIC and MedStar Health, about 180 health science students and resident physician leaders will be attending one of four, week-long Patient Safety Summer Camps being held in the United States this summer. The US camps are held each year in Telluride CO, Baltimore MD, and Napa CA. In addition, another 100 future healthcare leaders will be attending one of our AELPS International Patient Safety Summer Camps this year in Sydney, Australia and Doha, Qatar.
A new generation of caregivers – young physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other allied health professionals – are stepping up and starting to make a difference in healthcare. Many of them understand and appreciate they will soon be the gatekeepers for safe, high quality, high value patient care. They are taking this responsibility seriously – more seriously than I and my colleagues did when we were their age. These young leaders are the future of healthcare…and the future is bright.

We hope you will follow our activities and learnings through our student, resident and faculty blogs, found here on ETY or The Telluride Blog, found here. Please comment and join our conversation on the blogs or on Twitter (@TPSSC and #AELPS13).


Telluride Experience Goes International: Next Stop Doha, Qatar

Today marks the first time our Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety (#AELPS16) goes global with our “Telluride Experience” Patient Safety Summer Camp TE_Qatar_Faculty_2016curriculum kicking off in Doha, Qatar from March 23rd – 26th. A number of our faculty traveled from Washington, DC, Chicago and Denver to Doha yesterday to collaborate with health science leaders from Qatar in bringing our four-day Telluride Experience curriculum to many of the country’s current and future healthcare leaders.
In addition to our four-day safety camp, we will also be leading a faculty development program so healthcare leaders from Qatar can continue offering their own “Doha Experience” patient safety curriculum to future healthcare leaders on an annual basis. The collaboration is being sponsored by WISH – the World Innovation Healthcare Summit and the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development.

TE_Qatar_BrochureThe Telluride Experience team is very excited about being in Qatar, and are looking forward to the growing number of international collaborations ahead of us, with those who also believe ensuring the highest quality, lowest risk healthcare to the communities we serve requires Educating the Young – our future healthcare leaders.


Telluride Summer Camp for Faculty and Healthcare Administrators Now Available

HALL_Window_ViewIn 2016, the Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety (AELPS) will host its first session of patient safety education for healthcare leaders. Grown out of multiple requests from healthcare administrators, risk managers and health educators to attend our student and resident physician offerings, the AELPS team is adding yet another session–this time solely for faculty to be held in our Napa Valley location, July 27-30, 2016 with CE available for attendees.

Our group will continue to foster the small group setting, so attendance is limited. The goal of maintaining a smaller group size is the relationships that are built and the lasting learning that occurs when attendees feel free to talk openly about not only the stories shared as part of the curriculum, but also the stories offered up by attendees themselves. Utilizing stories and low-fidelity simulation as cornerstone curriculum, this is a one-of-a-kind patient safety meeting which will include faculty comprised of patient safety experts from all walks of healthcare, health education and safety science.

Join us in Napa next year!

Feel free to check out the website, or request more information here.

 


Telluride Alumni Building Their Own Patient Safety Baseball Diamonds

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 9.44.12 PMIts that wonderful time of year for baseball fans when spring training is winding down and opening day of baseball is just two weeks away. If you are a baseball junkie like I am, Field of Dreams has to be an all-time favorite baseball movie. It is my favorite, and when our Telluride alumni reach out with a new patient safety program they have initiated, I can’t help but think of the classic line, “If you build it, he will come,” that encouraged lead character Ray Kinsella to plow his corn field and turn it into a baseball diamond. Our Telluride mission, generously funded through the years by The Doctors Company Foundation, COPIC, CIR and MedStar Health, has been a similar leap of faith…”If you teach them, they will lead”.

The following post is by Telluride Alumni and Guest Authors: Byron Crowe, M3, Michael Coplin, M4/MBA Candidate, and Erin Bredenberg, M4 at the Emory University School of Medicine. Their work is another wonderful example that our Telluride mission is catching fire, and that the next generation of physician leaders are making a difference by building their own patient safety baseball diamonds.

Student-driven quality improvement initiatives are growing at Emory University, and the three of us – Erin Bredenberg, Michael Coplin, and Byron Crowe, all medical students at various stages of training – are using our experiences at Telluride to guide us as we create new learning opportunities for fellow students and improve care through QI projects.

We come from diverse backgrounds; prior to medical school, Erin was a Peace Corps volunteer, Michael spent time in investment banking, and Byron worked in hospital administration. Our personal experiences with the shortcomings of our healthcare system drove a shared interest in QI and patient safety, and we each eventually found our way to Telluride at some point during the last three years.

Telluride has shaped our trajectories at Emory in unique ways.

  • For Erin, now in her final year of medical school, the impact of the connections she made with other like-minded students inspired her to use the skills learned at Telluride while completing an MPH to educate others. She joined her local IHI Open School chapter as Director of Education where she organizes workshops and events to teach students key concepts in QI and patient safety, skills she honed working at the Atlanta VA hospital on a major falls prevention project.
  • Michael has become a key advocate for QI education within the medical school and has been integral in pulling together faculty and students to explore developing a longitudinal QI curriculum. He is currently earning an MBA at Emory and is channeling his interest in health systems efficiency into his work on a QI project in the emergency department.
  • Byron, now entering his third year, continues to lead the IHI Open School chapter at Emory and organize students around local QI projects. In the community, he is coordinating an ongoing partnership between a local safety net clinic and the Open School to improve care for diabetic patients.

We all agree that one of the most important aspects of our time at Telluride was the empowerment we felt from meeting other students who wanted to use their careers to make care safer and more effective through QI. Moreover, our experience at Telluride did not end once we returned to Emory–in addition to working together at school, we have remained connected to the amazing students we met at Telluride from other institutions.

Attending the Telluride conference taught each of us new things, whether about the healthcare system, our patients, communication, and ourselves. But it also enabled us to join a growing community of faculty and students who have attended Telluride and who share a commitment to improvement. Having a small piece of that community at Emory has been a formative and unforgettable part of our medical school experience.


Telluride Experience Deadline Extended: Apply by 2/15/15

The deadline to apply for 2015 sessions of The Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety: The Telluride Experience has been extended to February 15th! Medical students, nursing students with less than 10 years experience, and resident physicians can apply online at The Telluride Experience website by clicking here. Dates and locations include:

  • In Telluride, CO: For Health Science Students-June 7th-11th and for Resident Physicians-June 12th-16th.
  • In Napa, CA: For Health Science Students-July 26th-30th.
  • At Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City, MD: A combined session for Resident Physicians and Health Science Students-July 8th-12th.

Students who are accepted receive a full scholarship covering room, board, transportation voucher & all educational costs. Resident physicians accepted to attend should be sponsored by their program. Expected faculty for 2015 include healthcare and patient advocate thought leaders:

  • Founder–David Mayer, MD
  • Curriculum Director–Anne Gunderson, PhD
  • Aviation Consultant and Author–John Nance
  • Leadership Coach and Author–Paul Levy
  • Founder, Josie King Foundation–Sorrel King
  • Director, Foundations of Doctoring Program at University of Colorado–Wendy Madigowsky, MD
  • Healthcare Advocate and Author–Rosemary Gibson
  • President, Mothers Against Medical Error–Helen Haskell
  • Founder, Citizens for Patient Safety–Patty Skolnik
  • Director of Undergraduate Education, Clinical Excellence Commission–Kim Oates, MD
  • And more…

Join us in our 11th year and become part of a preeminent and growing alumni network while developing the skills and knowledge to be a patient safety leader of tomorrow!


Medical Student Speaks Up Under Influence of Telluride Mentors

Over the course of history, many young entrepreneurs have changed the world. Be it in the technology arena like Bill Gates, the social media world like Mark Zuckerberg or the newest Nobel Peace Prize co-winner, Malala Yousafzai–real change has been created by young leaders who envisioned a better way. These creative thinking young entrepreneurs are also leading change in healthcare. While their vision and action as patient safety advocates and role models may not send financial ripples across Wall Street, or redefine how we communicate with one another just yet, their efforts will save patient lives.

Over the last two years, ETY followers have read many stories about quality and safety projects being led by resident physician and health science student entrepreneurs, many Telluride Patient Safety Scholars and alumni. The attached video highlights another example of these young leaders in action, role-modeling the use of resilience tools that will make care safer for our patients. Daliha Aqbal, Telluride alumna and a medical student at the Georgetown School of Medicine, role models two resilience tools to over 300 faculty caregivers–the use of Safety Moments, and an example of “Stopping the Line” to validate and verify information when something doesn’t feel right. While many of these young leaders may not win a Nobel Peace Prize, they are truly helping change our safety culture as they lead by example.


400,000 Gravesites

Arlington_Cemetery_White_GravesOne of the highlights of our Telluride East Patient Safety Summer Camp each year is our trip to Arlington National Cemetery. The cemetery serves as a burial-place for “laying our Nation’s veterans and their family members to rest with dignity and honor.” Numerous daily honors, such as a horse-drawn caisson carrying an American flag draped casket, the firing of three rifle volleys, and the long bugler playing Taps, remind visitors of the service, sacrifice and valor displayed by those in the military protecting our freedoms.

As we walked through the cemetery, it was hard not to grasp the magnitude of the gravesites beside us. Everywhere I looked, white gravestones dotted the landscape. The tombstones seemed to go on forever…in the lower areas of the cemetery close to the main entrance, walking up the hill to Arlington House, or following the signs to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Everywhere I looked there were rows and rows of white tombstones – tens of thousands of them. Six hundred and forty-eight acres of tombstones marking burial sites with little room for much else–the cemetery is pretty much full, and needs more acreage. In fact, they recently chopped down a controversial 2 acres of trees to find a place for our more recent casualties of war. The informational brochure says the cemetery is currently the final resting place for more than 400,000 people.

400,000 people…the irony of that number struck me. That is the same number of patients who die every year due to preventable medical errors according to an article published in September 2013, A New Evidenced-based Estimate of Patient Harms Associated with Hospital Care in The Journal of Patient Safety. Lucian Leape brought some conceptual reality to the medical error crisis years ago by using the analogy of one jumbo jet crashing every day.  All those white tombstones that stretched to the end of the landscape and seemed to go on forever reflected the same number of patients who die each year from things like unnecessary infections, failure to recognize or rescue, medication dosing mistakes. We fill an Arlington Cemetery every year.

We have surpassed one jumbo jet per day. Standing at the top of the hill, looking in all directions…north, south, east, west…seeing the 400,000 gravesites spread out before me, and thinking this could be a preventable medical harm cemetery for just a single year is incomprehensible and unacceptable. What does it require for others to take this national epidemic seriously? When will we see the urgency needed to create meaningful change? It is a visual all Hospital CEO’s and political leaders should be required to experience.

Arlington_Cemetery_White_Graves3