Students Meet Faculty in Sydney #AELPS16

OperaHouse_from_WaterThe Telluride Experience faculty has arrived at Q Station Sydney Harbour National Park, an idyllic Telluridesque location in Manly, Australia. The Telluride Experience: Sydney faculty and students will be tucked into this retreat location in Sydney’s National Park just across the water from the lights and cosmopolitan city of Sydney. Q Station and the National Park has a little bit of all Australian terrains, including Manly cove beachfront, bush land and the protection of a canopy of rainforest-like red gum trees.

QStation_RedGumTreesThese spectacular trees serve as home or rest to 150 different types of birds, and resemble our collective efforts at changing healthcare culture by also renewing themselves each year, as they shed their bark presenting a fresh, new salmon colored skin to the surrounding environment.

An old Quarantine Station protecting Kim_FiresUp_Group_IntrosAustralians from smallpox or other contagious disease potentially carried by those seeking to become citizens during the 1830s through 1984, this could not be a more fitting location to host what will be the epicenter of local of patient safety learning over the next four days. Last night, the group shared conversation, introductions and local food and wine to start the week, welcoming one another to yet another intimate and
International patient safety Telluride Experience. Join the conversation on social media, using #AELPS16.Dave_Carrie_Lookat_Intros

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Telluride Experience Goes International: Next Stop Doha, Qatar

Today marks the first time our Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety (#AELPS16) goes global with our “Telluride Experience” Patient Safety Summer Camp TE_Qatar_Faculty_2016curriculum kicking off in Doha, Qatar from March 23rd – 26th. A number of our faculty traveled from Washington, DC, Chicago and Denver to Doha yesterday to collaborate with health science leaders from Qatar in bringing our four-day Telluride Experience curriculum to many of the country’s current and future healthcare leaders.
In addition to our four-day safety camp, we will also be leading a faculty development program so healthcare leaders from Qatar can continue offering their own “Doha Experience” patient safety curriculum to future healthcare leaders on an annual basis. The collaboration is being sponsored by WISH – the World Innovation Healthcare Summit and the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development.

TE_Qatar_BrochureThe Telluride Experience team is very excited about being in Qatar, and are looking forward to the growing number of international collaborations ahead of us, with those who also believe ensuring the highest quality, lowest risk healthcare to the communities we serve requires Educating the Young – our future healthcare leaders.


Thinking Differently to Change Healthcare

To all those looking to lead healthcare differently–

  • …to include and honor the voice of patients
  • …to ensure healthcare professionals are allowed to be open and honest with patients, and one another
  • …to honor a culture of safety above all else, and;
  • …to adopt wearables and other new technology that allow patients to better monitor and manage their own health

–here’s to the crazy ones.

And finally, another great “Jobism” from his oft quoted graduation speech at Stanford University, three years before his death:

“Stay hungry. Stay foolish.”


People With Passion Changing Healthcare for the Better

I recently watched the film, Jobs, a biopic based on the life of Steve Jobs, Apple Computer Cofounder, Chairman and CEO. Jobs and partner, Steve Wozniak, started the legendary company in his garage in 1976 in what ultimately resulted in one of, if not, the greatest changes to the landscape of personal computing and digital content development to date. Jobs’ vision and passion for creating technology that would extend the vision and passion of every one of us, never wavered even though he was challenged countless times by doubters with limited vision themselves.

So the story goes, Jobs was told by his Board, “people aren’t going to want a personal computer,” and he ultimately was fired from his own company in 1985, and then later rehired in what many call one of the greatest company turnarounds. Throughout the ups and downs of his career, Jobs remained passionate about the need to deliver the highest quality technology products directly to consumers, putting the ability to create just about anything in the homes of users. Thanks to Jobs passion, stubbornness and entrepreneurial spirit we now have the iMac, iPod, iPad, iTunes, iPhone…the list goes on…and ways in which consumers use each device continues to expand in direct proportion to the freedom given to the imagination.

Healthcare is adopting the devices created by Jobs and his Apple teams at the frontline of care in many places–places where visionary healthcare leadership is too passionate to hear the fearful naysayers that impede the progress we all know also prevents zero preventable harm and returns joy and meaning to the healthcare workplace. In the following clip from the Jobs film, actor Ashton Kutcher delivers the inspirational lines below. Whether Jobs actually said these exact words or not, he has said much that echoes similar sentiment. Those working to influence much needed change in healthcare can draw strength from the dialogue when faced with doubters of our own. To find like-minded healthcare colleagues, be sure to check out ChangeDayUSA!

You got to have a problem you want to solve, a wrong that you want to right. And it’s got to be something you are passionate about, otherwise you won’t have the perseverance to see it through…And in your life, you only get to do so many things, and right now, we’ve chosen to do this. So let’s make it great.

 


Telluride Alumni and “Paying it Forward”

Each day, we are barraged with hundreds of useless “junk” emails. Many have learned the tricks on how to make it through our spam filters and firewalls. However, amongst all that “noise” each week, one can find a few “pearls”. For me, the pearls are the emails I regularly receive from our Telluride Scholar Alumni.

Michael Slade, a second year medical student and Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp alumni, recently emailed me to share the following reflection on how his Telluride educational experience has translated into further patient safety education at his home institution. It’s this passion and enthusiasm for both patient safety and innovations in medical education that Telluride aims to inspire, in hopes that both will go viral in healthcare environments across the country.

One of the biggest things I took away from Telluride was the power of knowledge. Because of the Telluride conference and the speakers who presented, those of us who attended were able to go back to our home institutions with a transforming set of ideas. The problem is that, quite simply, we aren’t going to be able to make healthcare safer or more effective by empowering a hundred or two hundred providers at a time. We all need to go back to our respective healthcare homes not only as technicians, but also as educators.

When I left DC, that was my goal. The medical school here allows first year students to take several elective courses. With the help of a patient safety champion in the faculty, I spent the fall organizing a 10 hour course that included lectures on many of the topics we discussed at Telluride (HREs, human factors, standardized communication, etc) and attendance at hospital PS&Q conferences. We met our goal of enrolling 15 students in the course and completed it a couple of weeks ago. The feedback from the class was almost universally positive; one student (encouragingly) wrote “These are concepts that every med student can (and should!) buy into without extensive medical knowledge. I got a great snapshot of how things work in the hospital (good + bad), w/o being overwhelmed.” A student from the course is also taking over our local IHI branch next year and applying for Telluride this summer. We’re planning on offering the elective for the foreseeable future.

I just wanted to thank you (and by extension, the entire staff) for investing in me and the other attendees of the Telluride experience. The road to safe, reliable healthcare is not going to be an easy one, but I’m proud to be a part of the journey.

Many of us have spent the last four months preparing for the four Patient Safety week-long Summer Camps that will begin this coming June. As in past years, through the generous support of The Doctors Company Foundation, CIR, COPIC and MedStar Health, over 130 medical students, nursing students and resident physicians have been awarded full expense scholarships to attend the camps.  Like Michael, and the many others you have heard about through ETY the past year, we hope they too will leave with a higher sense of urgency and become change agents, leading safer, higher-quality, patient care in the future. That is how we will eventually reach our tipping point.


Top 10 Takeaways from #SXSW2014: Part Two

As promised, here are the remaining five of my Top 10 from this year’s SXSW marathon! If you haven’t been, I think it’s still worth going but the meeting itself is changing as  this year SXSW seemed to play host to a much larger big business presence than just past years. Innovation is contagious, and I believe those who jump in overcome common objections rooted in fear fairly quickly. “I’m not creative,” “Where’s the research?” and “I’m too old for change,” many be voiced silently or outwardly by leaders–in healthcare and elsewhere when it comes to the change associated with trying new approaches to common practice, but the fact that so many large organizations, from Blue Cross/Blue Shield to Deloitte & Touche, had a presence leads me to believe those fears are being overcome by opportunity realized.

  1. Screen Shot 2014-03-16 at 9.24.29 AMShare ideas-In Show Your Work, repeat speaker and tribe leader, Austin Kleon (author Steal Like An Artist ) shared the value in making your work public early, in a non-promotional way, and how that leads to being noticed. Sharing what you’ve discovered or what you’ve created allows for others to comment and build upon your work too, moving ideas forward faster. In healthcare, this idea remains a challenge, as Steal Like An Artist takes on a whole new meaning. But crowdsourcing for change has proven to work wonders in many industries, including healthcare–think FoldIt-a computer game enabling anyone to contribute to scientific research. Why not give it a try?
  2. Identify Pain Points-For software developers and more, this apparently is a common refrain. But this year at SXSW, I heard the phrase used more than ever before. In healthcare, we may know what our pain points are, but do we have a working strategy and action plan in place to actually move beyond them? Do you really know what your pain points are, and do you have a strategy in place to mitigate or move beyond?
  3. 3D Printing-3D Printers were everywhere in Austin this year. Last year, I saw only one exhibit throughout the meeting with a 3D printer in action. This year even Deloitte & Touche had a 3D printer putting out chachka for those who stopped by to visit. With Grey’s Anatomy using a 3D printer to save an infant, healthcare will undoubtedly see the maker movement invade our space.
  4. Anyone Can Create A Start Up-This follows the next takeaway: Do What You Love! While many of the keynote speakers made it sound easy to achieve their level of success, I’ve come to see that what these folks have in common is courage, passion, resilience and an unwillingness to settle for anything less than what they want. The cost of starting almost any online business is within reach of almost anyone, removing one of the greatest barriers to taking that first step. What do you have to lose?
  5. Do What You Love-This should be number one on the list. If you’re not doing what you love, change things today. Life is short!

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 7.49.16 AM


#SXSW2014 Kicks-Off with Full Healthcare Innovation Agenda

Drs_Office_DeathbedLast Friday marked the start of SXSW 2014 in Austin, TX — a meeting that pulls creatives and innovators from healthcare, media, film, tech and more, together to learn, exchange ideas and provide a jolt to the collective creative energy that stimulates change. Before the first session had even begun last Friday morning–and before I’d even had a real cup of coffee–I already had had thought-provoking discussions with a content developer from St. Jude Medical, a User Interface designer from Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and even bumped into Guy Kawasaki at the SXSW Bookstore. Those attending the meeting know it’s best to wear running shoes and pack power bars, as trying to absorb and get to as much content as possible requires almost marathon-like training.

Here are some highlights from the health tech sessions I have attended so far with more to follow:

  1. A hot topic during the session, Doctors Offices on Their Deathbed (shown above), was the idea of flipping the clinic–similar to flipping the classroom in education. According to Dr Gautam Gulati (@drgautamgulati), Chief Medical Officer & Head of Product Innovation at Physicians Interactive, who Skyped into the meeting, our ability to capture increasing amounts of data about patients outside the office will allow clinic time to be used by patients and providers to collaborate on care plans together–care plans that address the needs, values, preferences and goals of the patient.
  2. In the session, You Got Them to Do What…, wearables were the focus! Your Fitbits, Fuel Bands and more are gaining critical mass. While this has truly been a consumer-driven health movement, entrepreneurial physicians, manufacturers and developers, as well as consumers in-the-know, realize what power the data being collected on a daily basis holds for health prevention, treatment adherence and future prescriptions.
  3. And in Hacking Medical Training Through Innovation, the need to embrace the innovative/start-up minded student, provider and healthcare administrator was emphasized. According to the panel, medicine is losing these folks in droves as opportunities are slow to expand in the space, and are exploding in tech, biotech and health tech organizations. Many leading healthcare organizations are rising to this call, developing Accelerator programs and new positions, such as the Chief Medical Innovation Officer, to reward and recognize their entrepreneurial spirits.