Enter to Become A Young Physician Patient Safety Award Winner

Screen Shot 2015-01-12 at 5.59.46 PMWe have recently been reminded just how powerful the pen remains in stirring the hearts and minds of men and women around the world. And, we have often discussed on ETY how stories can change ideals, culture and even societal norms. With this knowledge in mind, we wanted to share the following opportunity offered by one of our Telluride Experience sponsors, The Doctors Company Foundation, in Partnership With The Lucian Leape Institute at The National Safety Patient Safety Foundation. This patient safety centered organization and partner is once again hosting a Young Physicians Patient Safety Award and essay contest for young physicians in training interested in sharing their story related to a personal experience with patient safety through the 4th year of medical school. The deadline to enter an essay is 5pm ET, February 2nd, and additional information on entering can be found below, as well as at the Doctors Company Foundation website.

Our Telluride Alum have been blogging and reflecting with great depth on wisdom gained in only the early years of their healthcare careers regarding just how complex an issue all things patient safety related can be. The hope is that at least a few will share their stories, along with their writing talents and passion for patient safety via this venue! Excerpts of essays from 2014 winners can be found in the ETY post, Sharing the Doctors Company Foundation 2014 Award Winning Essays. These winning essays have already served as safety moments in a large health system, as well as inspired peers to think and act differently when it comes to keeping patients safe.

In brief, The Doctors Company Foundation Young Physicians Patient Safety Award recognizes young physicians for:

…their personal insight into the importance of applying the principles of patient safety to reduce the incidence of medical error. Individuals are invited to submit essays about patient safety events they personally experienced during clinical rotations. The essays will be judged by a panel selected by the Lucian Leape Institute of the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF). Six winners will be selected and each will receive a $5,000 award, which will be presented at the Association of American Medical College’s (AAMC) Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago, June 2015.

Eligibility/Submission Requirements:

    • As of July 1, 2014 applicants must be either a 3rd or 4th year student in an American medical school
    • Award is for the best essay explaining your most instructional patient safety event during a clinical rotation-one that resulted in a personal transformation
    • Award will be presented by The Doctors Company Foundation at AAMC’s Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago
    • Essays will be judged and winners selected by panel identified by NPSF, all review committee decisions are final
    • In 500-1,000 words describe the most instructional patient safety event you experienced, one that resulted in a personal transformation. The essay should have an emotional impact on the reader and provide a lesson that is transferable to other medical students and medical professionals.
    • Explain how the event impacted your learning and growth and how the experience will help you to provide the safest care to your current and future patients. You must include examples of how to improve any system errors or processes that contributed to the adverse patient event and explain how you will ensure that the changes are implemented.

Description of relevant events for the essay includes any patient safety event, including “near misses”. A patient safety event is a process or an act of omission or commission that results in hazardous health care conditions and/or unintended harm to the patient. The event is often a consequence of a systems failure or error. Examples include medication related errors, communications errors, health care – associated infections, medical record errors, identification errors and delays in responding to critical diagnostics.

Essays must maintain the confidentiality and integrity of the patient and location of the event. Please use fictitious names and locations in the essay.


Telluride “Old West” Ski Town Embraces Patient Safety in Our Tenth Year Anniversary Celebration

TPSSC_Logo_v3June has always been a very exciting month for me. For the last nine years, I and many others have journeyed west to Telluride, CO, a beautiful mountain town known by many for its skiing as opposed to summer activities. For those outside CO, Telluride may be one of the best kept secrets in the United States. Many of us often choose to take the scenic six-hour journey from the Denver airport to Telluride each year, making our way up the mountain to run our annual Telluride Patient Safety Roundtable and Summer Camps. The trip provides an up close view and reminder of the silent power held within the peaceful surroundings in which we will be teaching for the next two weeks. Over the years, people have asked me “Why Telluride?” My response has always been the same – “Why not?”  Be it the “old west feel” of the town, or the “hypoxic” magic that happens at an elevation of 9,600 feet, Telluride has always been a learning mecca for everyone that joins us during these memorable weeks of high altitude education.

TSRC hosts about 30 scientific programs each summer. We have been fortunate to be one of those chosen each of the last ten years. In fact, out Patient Safety Roundtable and Summer Camps has now become the longest consecutive running meeting that TSRC has agreed to host. The smaller, roundtable format using small group breakouts and learner-centered activities is designed to foster creative thought and consensus building through lively conversation in a relaxed and informal setting. We purposely limit the use of power-point slides to ten each day so learners are fully engaged in the work but not spoon fed the information by people who like to lecture. The students and residents especially love this interactive format. This non-traditional learning environment also attracts patient safety leaders from around the world to Telluride each summer, to “break bread” and share ideas on current issues and challenges. Because of this unique venue and format, a lot of our discovery, sharing of ideas and learning happens on the walking paths, hiking on the mountain trails, in a coffee shop, or over a glass of wine.

Screen Shot 2013-06-02 at 10.46.03 PMThrough the generous support of The Doctors Company Foundation (TDCF), COPIC, Committee of Interns and Residents (CIR) and MedStar Health, about 130 health science students and resident physician leaders will be attending one of four, week-long Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps this summer. The first two weeks will be held in Telluride and the final two weeks will be held in the Washington DC/Baltimore MD region (“Telluride East”) later this summer. In the summer of 2015, thanks to the continued support of The Doctors Company Foundation, an additional Patient Safety Summer Camp will be held in CA – our new home for “Telluride West”.

Our objectives for the Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps are the same each year:

  1. To identify and help develop future healthcare leaders and champions in patient safety, transparency and open, honest and professional communication between patients, families and caregivers.
  2. To develop a growing number of Patient Safety Summer Camp alumni that serve as role models and mentors to (a) health science students and resident physicians at their respective medical centers and health systems, and (b) health science students and resident physicians enrolled in future Patient Safety Summer Camps.
  3. To create a social networking community where Patient Safety Summer Camp health science students, resident physicians and past alumni can interact with international leaders in patient safety, education and patient advocacy on issues pertaining to patient safety, transparency and open, honest and professional communication between patients, families and caregivers.
  4. To help create risk reduction and quality improvement collaborative projects between Patient Safety Summer Camp alumni, faculty and patient advocates that are implemented within the Patient Safety Summer Camp alum’s institution and beyond.

DSC_0684This coming weekend, many wonderful and highly committed patient safety advocates and safety leaders will once again convene in Telluride, CO to continue our mission of “Educating the Young”. Over the past 10 years, we now will have had over 400 Telluride student and resident alumni scholars attend one of our Patient Safety Summer Camps. As you have read on our ETY blog, many have done amazing work in leading change that is helping make care safer and more transparent.

Next week, we will kick off this year’s Patient Safety Summer Camps by welcoming thirty resident physicians into our Telluride Scholars club. They are future physician leaders from all across the country who will be immersed in learning about transparency, patient safety, and patient partnership. It truly is an amazing experience that always leaves me and many others energized for months to follow.


Sharing The Doctors Company Foundation 2014 Award-Winning Essays

At the National Patient Safety Foundation annual meeting in May, the sharing of patient stories was once again at the forefront of the meeting. Helen Haskell, Tanya Lord, Regina Holliday and more, provided real-life examples of why a focus on patient safety is still a much needed and continuous journey. There is also a growing awareness of the need to honor provider stories, perhaps one of the missing links in the quest for zero preventable harm across the country. The Doctors Company Foundation (TDCF) is well aware of the power of medical student and resident physician stories, and instituted the Young Physicians Patient Safety Award, which is given to the author of the best patient safety driven essays written by 3rd and 4th year medical students, and first year resident physicians. TDCF shared those essays and the award winners at this year’s NPSF, with the winners to be honored at the 6th Annual Association of American Medical Colleges’ Integrating Quality meeting June 12th & 13th.

Excerpts from the winning essays follow, but being less than two weeks away from our first 2014 Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp–and in our 10th Anniversary year–it was with great enthusiasm that I read the 2014 Award-Winning Essays. Since 2010, our student and resident physician driven Telluride blog has seen an increase in submissions, and I can only hope it is more than the younger generation’s acculturation into blogging communities or social media. I would like to believe it has more to do with the younger generation of providers embracing the transparency that will be needed as they navigate the challenging landscape the present day career in healthcare holds. The following excerpts, like our blog posts, hold knowledge and wisdom far beyond the years of the author’s tenure, and are equally reflective of what is needed to provide the full complement of safe, patient-centered care we all want. We talk of educating the young, but far more often, they are educating and inspiring us. So in the spirit of educating the young (and old!)–Please keep writing!

…I read everything I could get my hands on about root cause analysis, the Swiss cheese model, and methods to “engineer out” potential for human error. It was not until my third-year surgery rotation, however, that I encountered the major challenge to patient safety that no number of PDSA cycles can resolve–the problem of a medical culture that is not safety conscious…

 

…In the case of this patient, who cannot read, more time has to be spent educating him about his medications and adverse drug reactions…emphasizing the most important points to be certain they’re understood…Some patients may not readily admit to their health care provider that they cannot read, and we should be sensitive to clues that suggest the patient may be illiterate…

 

TIME: 6:00AM, Surgery Morning Rounds Began: Ms. A, your MRI shows you have colorectal cancer…said my surgery attending, who rushed out of Ms. A’s room right after he dropped this shocking news…TIME 12:30pm Rounds Just Adjourned: A nurse ran into the surgery dictation room: “Who is Ms. A’s doctor? Did you know she has depression, and today is the first time she’s heard she had cancer? She just attempted suicide”…I was shocked by this…how could the whole surgery team not know Ms. A hadn’t yet been informed of her cancer status?…

 

 


Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps & The Doctors Company Foundation Add “Telluride West” for 2015

David Kern, in his book entitled Curriculum Development for Medical Education: A Six-Step Approach, said, “The ultimate purpose of a curriculum in medical education is to address problems that affect the health of the public.” I think we can all agree patient safety is a public health problem, however, medical and nursing schools have been slow to change in the face of this crisis, and instead, remain mired in a very traditional 1980’s curricular model. I can’t help but think of Einstein’s mantra…“insanity is doing the same thing over and over, yet expecting a different result”.

Fortunately, others are trying to help…

TDFThe Doctors Company Foundation (TDCF), created in 2008 by The Doctors Company–the nation’s largest insurer of medical professional liability for physicians, surgeons, and other health professionals–is one group at the forefront of medical education change, supporting many medical education programs and projects. From their website:

The purpose of the Foundation is to support patient safety education for health care professionals in training and in practice, patient safety research with clinically useful applications, and medical professional liability research.

TPSSC_Logo_v3TDCF has also been a long-time supporter of the Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps for health science students. Over the last four years, through their generous support, close to 200 health science students will have attended one of our week-long patient safety summer camps. Student summer camp reflections and experiences have been shared on the ETY blog through the years, as well as the Telluride Sumer Camp blog.

Because of our past success, and the willingness of The Doctors Company and its Foundation’s mission to make care safer for our patients, we are excited to announce that the Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp will now offer three one-week student summer camps in 2015–with our newest patient safety camp being held in California (“Telluride West”). Ninety health science students from across the country will now be able to attend one of the three, one-week patent safety summer camps being held in Colorado, Washington DC and California. Leaders and visionaries from The Doctors Company and its Foundation, such as Richard Anderson, David Troxel, Leona Siadek-Rice and TDCF board members, believe in the Educate the Young premise, and back it up through their generous and continued support of our Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp mission.

Combined with the two weeks of Patient Safety Summer Camps for Resident Physicians supported by COPIC, CIR and MedStar Health, there will now be five weeks of patient safety summer camps offered each year. That makes over 150 of our future health care leaders immersed in patient safety and transparency education led by international leaders in patient safety. I think even Einstein would be happy….

 


The @DoctorsCompany Foundation Young Physicians #PatientSafety Award Now Taking Applications

IMG_7718Because so many of our readers are compassionate young physicians, and physicians-in-training, we wanted to share another opportunity for you to showcase that passion and commitment for keeping patients safe. The Doctors Company Foundation, an organization that also sponsors a number of medical student attendees to participate in our Telluride Student Summer Camps, is partnering with the Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) to offer The Doctors Company Foundation Young Physicians Patient Safety Award. The award will recognize young physicians for “their deep personal insight into the significance of patient safety work.”

More information can be found, here on the NPSF website, or via The Doctors Company Foundation. A short summary follows:

Applicants are invited to submit essays that will be judged by a panel identified by NPSF. Six winners of this prestigious award will be selected and receive a $5,000 award, which will be presented at the Association of American Medical College’s (AAMC) Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago, June 12-13, 2014. Nominations must be submitted by 5:00pm ET, Monday Feb 3, 2014.

Eligibility:

  • As of June 2013, applicants must be either a 3rd or 4th year medical student or a 1st year resident in hospital setting
  • Award is for the best essay explaining your most instructional patient safety event during a clinical rotation-one that resulted in a personal transformation
  • Award will be conferred by The Doctors Company Foundation in partnership with the Lucian Leape Institute at AAMC’s Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago

For an example of this year’s winning essays, click here. Please contact us or visit the websites if you have questions! We know there are many Telluride Alumni deserving of an award like this so please enter, and share the patient-centered care you are working so hard to make standard of care. Good luck!


Telluride – “Old West” Ski Town Embraces Patient Safety

Screen Shot 2013-06-02 at 10.45.44 PMJune has always been a very exciting month for me. For the last eight years, Tim McDonald and I have journeyed west to Telluride, CO, a beautiful mountain town known by many for its skiing than summer activities. For those outside CO, Telluride may be one of the best kept secrets around. We often choose to take the scenic six hour journey from the Denver airport to Telluride each June, making our way up the mountain to run our annual Telluride Patient Safety Roundtable and Summer Camps, and to be reminded of the power of the peaceful surroundings we will be teaching in for the next 2-3 weeks. Over the years, people have asked me “Why Telluride?” My response has always been the same – “Why not?”  Be it the “old west feel” of the town, or the magic that happens at an elevation of 9,600 feet, Telluride has always been a learning mecca for us.

Nana Naisbitt, Executive Director of Telluride Scientific Research Center (TSRC) and her son Rory, have been wonderful to work with through the years. TSRC hosts about 24 scientific programs each summer. The smaller, roundtable format we use is designed to foster creative thought and consensus building through lively conversation in a relaxed and informal setting. This format attracts patient safety leaders from around the world to Telluride each summer to “break bread” and share ideas on current issues and challenges. Because of this unique venue, a lot of discovery and sharing of ideas happen on the walking paths, hiking on the mountain trails, in a coffee shop, or over a glass of wine.

Screen Shot 2013-06-02 at 10.46.03 PMThrough the generous support of The Doctors Company Foundation (TDCF), COPIC, Committee of Interns and Residents (CIR), Mag Mutual and MedStar Health, over 100 health science students and resident physician leaders will be attending one of three, week-long Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps this summer. The first two weeks will be in Telluride and a third week in Washington DC later this summer. Numerous health science students and resident physician leaders from across the country applied for one of the summer camp opportunities.

Our objectives for the Patient Safety Summer Camps are the same each year:

  1. To identify and help develop future healthcare leaders and champions in patient safety, transparency and open, honest and professional communication between patients, families and caregivers.
  2. To develop a growing number of Patient Safety Summer Camp alumni that serve as role models and mentors to (a) health science students and resident physicians at their respective medical centers and health systems, and (b) health science students and resident physicians enrolled in future Patient Safety Summer Camps.
  3. To create a social networking community where Patient Safety Summer Camp health science students, resident physicians and past alumni can interact with international leaders in patient safety, education and patient advocacy on issues pertaining to patient safety, transparency and open, honest and professional communication between patients, families and caregivers.
  4. To help create risk reduction and quality improvement collaborative projects between Patient Safety Summer Camp alumni, faculty and patient advocates that are implemented within the Patient Safety Summer Camp alum’s institution and beyond.

Screen Shot 2013-06-02 at 10.46.14 PMNext Monday, many wonderful and highly committed patient safety advocates and leaders will once again convene in Telluride to continue our mission of “Educating the Young”. The first week, we will have twenty-nine resident physicians, future physician leaders from across the country, immersed in learning about transparency, patient safety, and patient partnership. It truly is an amazing experience that always leaves me energized for months to follow.