People are dying to be asked to make a difference

Those where the words shared by former President Bill Clinton as he helped kick-off the 2015 Patient Safety, Science and Technology Summit this past weekend (http://patientsafetymovement.org/). The former president has been a keynote speaker at all three annual Summits and sees the Patient Safety Movement’s mission similar to the Clinton Foundation Global Initiatives Program (GIP).

Working with former President Clinton, Joe Kiani adopted a similar “commitment” model used by Clinton’s collaborative GIP in selecting preventable medical harm and setting a goal of Zero Preventable Deaths by 2020 (0X2020). There has been a lot of great work by many patient safety advocates since the release of the IOM report on preventable medical harm fifteen years ago. The Patient Safety Movement is another example of people wanting to make a difference and help reduce risk in healthcare. We hear “it takes a village” and Joe Kiani continues to bring more people wanting to make a difference into the “safety village”.

joebidenThis year, Joe worked his magic and was also able to bring Vice President Joe Biden into the safety village. The Vice President was wonderful – he spoke passionately and eloquently about the safety crisis. He admitted that two years ago when he agreed to meet with Joe, he knew little about the preventable medical error crisis but quickly changed his 30 minute meeting with Joe into a two-hour tutorial on the issue.  Like many others, he has become an engaged partner and re-arranged his very busy schedule so he could attend, address the crowd and hear about the great work going on by many.

In a short time, the Patient Safety Movement has brought high-ranking “partners” into the safety village, added tremendous value to the mission, and brought significant attention to the great work done by many others over the past fifteen years.

As former President Clinton said, we need to embrace more “people who are dying to be asked to make a difference”. It does take a village…and we need to continue to grow our safety village.

Advertisements

Changing the Narrative of Healthcare Culture

Of all the books on my nightstand, Timothy Wilson’s, Redirect: Changing the Stories We Live By, has quickly risen to the top of the stack. An easy-to-read, research supported, “how to” on the tools we can use to craft personal narratives that change behavior is music to an already adopted choir. What we have accomplished intuitively with good catch stories, and sharing of patient and provider stories in the healthcare workplace crafted to influence culture change to date, now has a loosely related scientific explanation as to why it may be working. All along, these stories have been providing the “story-prompts” Wilson speaks of–also known as alternative ways of viewing the tough, lesser talked about events that occur in a healthcare setting. Applying Wilson’s research on narrative to healthcare culture, the repercussions of patient harm which often includes healthcare professional feelings of guilt or depression compounded by the lack of a just culture from which to manage both can now be the “old” story, and we can eagerly rewrite exactly what we want our future healthcare culture to look like. We can create a better way of managing both patient and provider when things don’t go as planned by writing the new narrative, along with the roadmap to achieve our new healthcare worldview.

It was the recent NY Times Well Blog post, Writing Your Way to Happiness, by Tara Parker-Pope summarizing Wilson’s Redirect, that prompted me to sit down at the keyboard, as she writes:

The scientific research on the benefits of so-called expressive writing is surprisingly vast. Studies have shown that writing about oneself and personal experiences can improve mood disorders, help reduce symptoms among cancer patients, improve a person’s health after a heart attack, reduce doctor visits and even boost memory

The concept is based on the idea that we all have a personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves. But sometimes our inner voice doesn’t get it completely right. Some researchers believe that by writing and then editing our own stories, we can change our perceptions of ourselves and identify obstacles that stand in the way of better health…

What is surprising to me is that this fact is surprising to so many. In third grade, thanks to the educational genius of Robin Fogarty PhD, an elementary school teacher at the time and now educational consultant, my classmates and I learned early on the power of daily journaling, or documenting the personal narrative. Wilson takes this healthy release one step further, and teaches those who want to change behavior to create a new personal narrative that matches the desired story of our lives. It’s not just writing the outcome either, but also a well-crafted tale of how to get there. His book provides real tools that can be applied to personal or professional life, as well as to encourage the lasting change needed in healthcare. And, his work reinforces the numerous posts on the power of storytelling here on ETY, as well as in the recently released eBook, Using Stories to Influence Change in Healthcare Culture.

For those who enjoy video versus an inviting tome, check out Wilson’s lecture below on the same topic!


Telluride Experience Deadline Extended: Apply by 2/15/15

The deadline to apply for 2015 sessions of The Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety: The Telluride Experience has been extended to February 15th! Medical students, nursing students with less than 10 years experience, and resident physicians can apply online at The Telluride Experience website by clicking here. Dates and locations include:

  • In Telluride, CO: For Health Science Students-June 7th-11th and for Resident Physicians-June 12th-16th.
  • In Napa, CA: For Health Science Students-July 26th-30th.
  • At Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City, MD: A combined session for Resident Physicians and Health Science Students-July 8th-12th.

Students who are accepted receive a full scholarship covering room, board, transportation voucher & all educational costs. Resident physicians accepted to attend should be sponsored by their program. Expected faculty for 2015 include healthcare and patient advocate thought leaders:

  • Founder–David Mayer, MD
  • Curriculum Director–Anne Gunderson, PhD
  • Aviation Consultant and Author–John Nance
  • Leadership Coach and Author–Paul Levy
  • Founder, Josie King Foundation–Sorrel King
  • Director, Foundations of Doctoring Program at University of Colorado–Wendy Madigowsky, MD
  • Healthcare Advocate and Author–Rosemary Gibson
  • President, Mothers Against Medical Error–Helen Haskell
  • Founder, Citizens for Patient Safety–Patty Skolnik
  • Director of Undergraduate Education, Clinical Excellence Commission–Kim Oates, MD
  • And more…

Join us in our 11th year and become part of a preeminent and growing alumni network while developing the skills and knowledge to be a patient safety leader of tomorrow!


Enter to Become A Young Physician Patient Safety Award Winner

Screen Shot 2015-01-12 at 5.59.46 PMWe have recently been reminded just how powerful the pen remains in stirring the hearts and minds of men and women around the world. And, we have often discussed on ETY how stories can change ideals, culture and even societal norms. With this knowledge in mind, we wanted to share the following opportunity offered by one of our Telluride Experience sponsors, The Doctors Company Foundation, in Partnership With The Lucian Leape Institute at The National Safety Patient Safety Foundation. This patient safety centered organization and partner is once again hosting a Young Physicians Patient Safety Award and essay contest for young physicians in training interested in sharing their story related to a personal experience with patient safety through the 4th year of medical school. The deadline to enter an essay is 5pm ET, February 2nd, and additional information on entering can be found below, as well as at the Doctors Company Foundation website.

Our Telluride Alum have been blogging and reflecting with great depth on wisdom gained in only the early years of their healthcare careers regarding just how complex an issue all things patient safety related can be. The hope is that at least a few will share their stories, along with their writing talents and passion for patient safety via this venue! Excerpts of essays from 2014 winners can be found in the ETY post, Sharing the Doctors Company Foundation 2014 Award Winning Essays. These winning essays have already served as safety moments in a large health system, as well as inspired peers to think and act differently when it comes to keeping patients safe.

In brief, The Doctors Company Foundation Young Physicians Patient Safety Award recognizes young physicians for:

…their personal insight into the importance of applying the principles of patient safety to reduce the incidence of medical error. Individuals are invited to submit essays about patient safety events they personally experienced during clinical rotations. The essays will be judged by a panel selected by the Lucian Leape Institute of the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF). Six winners will be selected and each will receive a $5,000 award, which will be presented at the Association of American Medical College’s (AAMC) Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago, June 2015.

Eligibility/Submission Requirements:

    • As of July 1, 2014 applicants must be either a 3rd or 4th year student in an American medical school
    • Award is for the best essay explaining your most instructional patient safety event during a clinical rotation-one that resulted in a personal transformation
    • Award will be presented by The Doctors Company Foundation at AAMC’s Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago
    • Essays will be judged and winners selected by panel identified by NPSF, all review committee decisions are final
    • In 500-1,000 words describe the most instructional patient safety event you experienced, one that resulted in a personal transformation. The essay should have an emotional impact on the reader and provide a lesson that is transferable to other medical students and medical professionals.
    • Explain how the event impacted your learning and growth and how the experience will help you to provide the safest care to your current and future patients. You must include examples of how to improve any system errors or processes that contributed to the adverse patient event and explain how you will ensure that the changes are implemented.

Description of relevant events for the essay includes any patient safety event, including “near misses”. A patient safety event is a process or an act of omission or commission that results in hazardous health care conditions and/or unintended harm to the patient. The event is often a consequence of a systems failure or error. Examples include medication related errors, communications errors, health care – associated infections, medical record errors, identification errors and delays in responding to critical diagnostics.

Essays must maintain the confidentiality and integrity of the patient and location of the event. Please use fictitious names and locations in the essay.