A Young Nurse and Telluride Alumni Shares Inspiring Words on Keeping Patients Safe

Today’s post is from guest author Brennan Killeen, RN, BSN, Clinical Nurse at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital (MGUH) and Telluride Scholar June 2015. Brennan was asked to give a speech to this year’s MGUH Nurse Residency graduating class. Her focus was patient safety and her experience at the Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps. We are so happy to see the premise “Educate the Young” continues to build momentum in a new generation of healthcare leaders.

Hello everyone and congratulations on your graduation. I’m Brennan Killeen. I graduated from the Nurse Residency Program here at Georgetown this past March. I work on C4-1, the Cardiovascular and Thoracic Intermediate Care Unit and I’m coming up on my 2-year mark as a nurse in February. I was a second-degree nursing student here at Georgetown before starting my career as a nurse on C4-1. I remember feeling all of the same emotions you all felt after graduation: the anxiety of finding a job, picking a city, finding the right hospital, the right manager, deciding whether or not being part of a residency program was the right fit… I want you to take a moment and reflect on all of your accomplishments thus far. Graduating from nursing school, passing your boards, landing a job at such a well-respected place like Georgetown and completing your first year as a nurse are big deals!

2015-06-08 15.16.19I’ve actually been to this ceremony 3 times now. The first time was when I was still a baby nurse and had barely gotten on the floor yet. I remember sitting here and feeling slightly panicked that I’d never be able to complete an NRP poster or that I’d make a make a med error, I wouldn’t know how to hang blood, or I’d never get over being intimidated by doctors and senior nurses – there were so many emotions that flooded my mind that first ceremony. I did feel very overwhelmed but I never felt alone. I felt calm knowing that if I didn’t feel confident about my poster presentation I had Kristine and Kim, or if I was scared about making a med error or performing a procedure incorrectly I had my coworkers and policies to turn to, or if I felt intimidated I had my manager, Elly, or educator, Alisa to ask for guidance. This is the beauty in a place like Georgetown. The support that is provided to you as a new nurse is incredible. There are systems in place so that it’s hard for us as new nurses to fail and there are people around you who truly care about your success. There’s a palpable sense of pride at Georgetown. We honor our spirit values, we support one another and we always put the patient first by practicing as safely as possible.

The second ceremony this past March was my graduation. It was a day when everything really came full circle. I felt proud of myself and my NRP partner for completing a project that we felt passionate about. I felt so excited my classmates and I had survived our first year as nurses. I remember walking around and observing the posters and feeling giddy. It was such a big moment for all of us. We’d become comfortable in our practice and it was hard to believe that we were no longer the new nurses. By this time, I’d become involved in Georgetown’s falls task force because of my interest in patient safety and I knew that my second year of nursing would give me the opportunity to take on more responsibility.

Today is my third ceremony and I felt so much confidence in Georgetown when I walked around the room earlier and looked at your presentations. You all should be so proud of yourselves! You’ve survived your first year. But with that comes a new set of challenges and goals. It’s time to push yourself to really dive into this wonderful community. You’re veterans now and it’s you who’s going to be guiding the new nurses. The opportunities that Georgetown provides for us are countless. During my second year as a nurse I felt a strong sense of obligation to get involved. Georgetown invests so much time and energy in creating a safe environment for us as new nurses and in turn a safe environment for the patient. I can’t tell you how many times I felt thankful over the last year and a half for all of the safety measures that were in place for me at Georgetown: policies, MC75s, double checks, bed alarms, daily rounding and the list goes. All of these measures promoted safe practice for me and influenced my passion for patient safety.

Students_Reception_Mtn_BackgroundThis summer I had the amazing opportunity to attend a safety camp in Telluride, Colorado sponsored by The Doctors Company Foundation and MedStar Health. It was the first year that Georgetown nurses were included in the camp in large part due to Eileen’s Ferrell’s efforts. Med students, nursing students, doctors and nurses from around the country were able to gather together in Telluride to expand our knowledge on patient safety. We spent the week discussing patient safety improvement, techniques, philosophy and approaches for reducing patient injury and adverse outcomes. Family members of victims devastated by medical errors also attended the camp to collaborate with us on ways to make system changes to avoid such errors. It was an eye-opening week for me and I learned so much. The sense of empowerment I felt after the conference was incredible. Knowing that we’re at a place like Georgetown where we can make a change after just a year and a half of being a nurse is an amazing feeling. One of the risk reduction strategies we discussed during the week was education. In our residency program Georgetown specifically carves out time during our classes to educate us on such strategies. This community encourages us to call for help and demands that this is a sign of excellence and not a sign of weakness. We belong to an organization with a just culture that applauds transparency and shared-decision making. As nurses we are encouraged to promote a culture of compassion, empathy and trust and in doing so we stand by our mission to provide safe, high quality care, excellent service and education to improve the health of our community.

Telluride truly has been the highlight of my nursing career thus far and I have Georgetown to thank for that. I didn’t think that back in March I’d be standing up here speaking to you all about my Telluride safety experience but Georgetown challenged me to be better, to do more and to get involved.

I want to leave you with a story from Telluride that really resonated with me and inspired me to prioritize patient safety during my nursing career. Lewis Blackman was a 15-year-old boy who died from a medical error following elective routine surgery in November of 2000. He suffered due to deficiencies in the system. He’d been prescribed Toradol post operatively. He was on an inadequate amount of IV fluids and it was a 2-day struggle to get the IV fluids increased but by then it seemed like the damage had been done. After 30 hours of alarming clinical decline, 24 hours of no urine output and 4 hours of an undetectable BP, Lewis died on post op day 4 from an NSAID induced duodenal ulcer. During the morning of Lewis’s death, doctors and nurses scoured the hospital to find a cuff or a machine that worked so that they could detect Lewis’s undetectable BP. They took his BP 12 times using 7 different machines and cuffs, dismissing the undetectable BP as an equipment error. Lewis eventually went into cardiac arrest. Could his death been averted by an assertive nurse? Could open and honest communication have prevented this error? If the doctors and nurses had practiced mindfulness and considered the family as part of the healthcare team would Lewis still be alive today?

This story speaks directly to safety. It’s an example of why nurse empowerment in reference to patient safety is so critical and why you all are so valuable to the lives of our patients. We belong to an institution that empowers us to speak up, to be accountable, to communicate and above all to practice as safely as possible. I ask you all to remember this every day and to teach our new nurses that it’s okay to speak up, it’s okay to say you’re unsure of something, it’s okay to ask questions. By doing so, you could save a Lewis Blackman or a family from tragedy like this.

Now that you are official graduates of your residency program, I challenge you to lead by example and continue to foster a safe environment here at Georgetown. You are now leaders and it’s your job to take our new nurses under your wing and show them the way. Dave Mayer, our VP for Quality and Safety here at MedStar told our Telluride group this: “leadership is like tennis, it’s a skill that you always have to work on.” I’m proud to have you all as leaders and I have confidence in each and every one of you that we will be a safer institution because of you. Congratulations!

John Nance Reflects on The Telluride Experience and Need for Patient Safety Immersive Learning

Today’s post is by Guest Author, John Nance, Telluride Experience Faculty, Author and ABC Aviation Consultant


Having had the delightful experience of attending and working with all of the sessions of the Telluride Experience this summer,  I’ve spent some time since returning from Napa thinking through the scope and the effectiveness of what we all came together to advance: The goal of never again losing a patient to a medical mistake or nosocomial infection.

It may well sound hackneyed, but in fact I think all of us as faculty mean it to the depth of our beings when we say that the medical students and residents and nurses – all of those who joined us – are truly the best hope of changing the course of a noble but tattered non-system that slaughters people at the rate of 50 per hour.  That does not mean that existing healthcare professionals cannot or will not embrace the dramatic changes that are required to keep patients safe, because, indeed, thousands are passionately involved in just such efforts.   It does mean, however that the opportunity for leadership from the newer members of this profession will be critical, from the small and subtle gestures, to the grand and sweeping reforms.

And the potential for meaningful  leadership, of course, is why those who joined us were selected in the first place, and what we expect of them from here on:  Courageous leadership steeled against the oppressive influence of the status quo.

Having participated in this battle for patient safety for nearly a quarter of a century, I can say with some degree of authority that no matter how many presentations, discussions, articles, consulting hours, or other efforts are thrown at the problem nationally, creating a major cultural change is perhaps an order of magnitude more difficult when you’re surrounded by the very environment you’re needing to alter.  Coming together at a distance – especially in a resort atmosphere, or in the incredible beauty of Telluride itself – is an important element in achieving transference of ideas, concepts, goals, and determination as free of dogmatic and traditional thinking as possible.  And, of course, catching people at the beginning of their careers before the insidious influence of cultural rigidity has been allowed to take root and oppose change,  is an equally important key.  I know of no better forum than this, and I’m truly honored to be a part of it.

John Nance BooksAnd so we came together and told you horrifying stories that made us all cry, exposed young learners to the realities and predictability of professional human failure,  and rubbed all our noses in the reality that a profession whose routine operations count as the third leading cause of death in America does not possess the ethical choice to resist meaningful change.

But at the end of the day – and our time together – it all comes down to taking those small sparks of understanding and recognition and fanning them into flames back home,  never forgetting that every hospital room,  scheduled surgery, ambulance arrival,  admission, or diagnostic test involves a fellow human who is as entitled to the highest standard of care and caring as your own family.

From a very personal POV, I thoroughly enjoyed meeting each of our participants this season and pushing the quest forward, and I look forward not just to next year, but to hearing how the seeds we all helped sow will sprout and change the landscape of American healthcare.

The Doctors Company Foundation Opens Applications for 2016 Young Physician Leader Essay Contest

Vinyard_With_ViewAs our final week of the 2015 Telluride Experience comes to a close, our Telluride blog has been nourished by a new year of talented healthcare trainee reflections. Many of these young physicians and physicians-in-training, along with their nursing colleagues, have submitted reflections that we will share more on moving forward, but they can be viewed here today.

Because our scholars and Alumni often return to the ETY blog as a reference tool, we wanted to share another opportunity for all to showcase their passion and commitment for keeping patients safe through writing. The Doctors Company Foundation, an organization that also sponsors a number of medical student attendees to participate in our Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety each year, is once again partnering with the Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) to offer The Doctors Company Foundation Young Physicians Patient Safety Award. The award will recognize young physicians for “their personal insight into the importance of applying the principles of patient safety to reduce the incidence of medical error.” Applicants are invited to submit essays of 500-1,000 words about a patient safety event they personally experienced during clinical rotations that resulted in a personal transformation.

More information can be found on The Doctors Company Foundation website. A short summary follows:

Applicants are invited to submit essays that will be judged by a panel identified by NPSF. Six winners of this prestigious award will be selected and receive a $5,000 award, which will be presented at the Association of American Medical College’s (AAMC) Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago, June 2016. Nominations must be submitted by 5:00pm ET, Monday Jan 25, 2016.


  • As of July 1st, 2015, applicants must be either a 3rd or 4th year medical student at an American medical school
  • Award is for the best essay explaining your most instructional patient safety event experienced during a clinical rotation and that resulted in a personal transformation
  • Award will be presented by The Doctors Company Foundation at AAMC’s Annual Integrating Quality meeting in Chicago
  • Registration, hotel and travel will be covered to the AAMC meeting for Award recipients

Examples of winning essays from 2014 can be viewed via a past ETY posts (click here), and a review of the 2015 Essay Winners will soon follow. For additional questions, visit The Doctors Company Foundation website, here. We know there are many Telluride Alumni deserving of an award like this so please enter, and share the patient-centered care you are working so hard to make standard of care. Good luck!


It is happening…a New Generation of Healthcare Professionals

TE_Napa_GroupIt is happening…and it is growing. A newer generation of caregivers – young physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other allied health professionals – are stepping up and starting to make a difference. Many of them understand and appreciate they will soon be the gatekeepers for high quality, low risk, high value patient care. They seem to be taking this responsibility seriously – more seriously than I and my older generation colleagues did at their age. They stay connected reading new information shared through social media outlets. They are doing regular literature searches for new articles on quality, safety and value. They want to learn and understand.

TE_Napa_Reception3The reflective post shared below by Rajiv Sethi is just one of many similar posts that come from our Patient Safety Summer Camps. These young learners don’t just write reflections…they take their reflections and use them to research and learn best practices related to the topic in question. They want to learn, they yearn to learn.

There are days when many of us feel we are slogging uphill, going nowhere and will never live to see the changes so badly needed in healthcare. Working with these young caregivers revitalizes the faculty, just as much as the students are energized and educated around patient safety. Spending time to both educate and learn from the young is so important to the future of healthcare, but also our future and the future of every patients.

Reflections from Day One

Published July 28, 2015 | By Rajiv Sethi

Having only been at Telluride Experience: #AELPS11 for a day, I hadn’t imagined I would have learned so much. We covered a variety of topics with important patient safety learning points. I am so grateful for the opportunity to be here and share the experience with so many motivated individuals keen to be change agents.

I wanted to focus on one of the key moments for me: The Story of Lewis Blackman (http://qsen.org/faculty-resources/videos/the-lewis-blackman-story/). We were very lucky to have Helen Haskell (Lewis Blackman’s Mother) with us and I am so grateful to her for sharing her story. So many issues were raised during the video and I was able to draw many parallels to health care in the UK. For example, the issue of reduced staffing levels on the weekend (see link). The consequences of this can be severe as was found in a study published in the BMJ, Day of week procedure and 30 day mortality for elective surgery… where patients undergoing planned surgery were more likely to die if they have their operation at the end of the week. The new plans proposed by Jeremy Hunt (Health Secretary) to increase staffing provision at the weekend in the UK are causing much controversy, recently culminating in the hashtag #IminworkJeremy (staff posting pictures of themselves at work at the weekend).

Another issue I wanted to focus on may seem rather obvious, but as a student I believe is one of the easiest things to incorporate in daily practice; the importance of health care professionals and students introducing themselves fully to patients. In the story of Lewis Blackman, there was a lack of communication and identification of the team involved in the care of Lewis. As a result his family were unaware of who best to raise issues with.

There is so much to learn from this story but I want to end reflecting on Dr Kate Granger’s hashtag #HelloMyNameIs campaign. On her blog she describes herself as a doctor and terminally ill cancer patient musing about life and death (Click here for story). She has done remarkable work in encouraging health care staff to introduce themselves to patients, with support from over 400,000 staff in over 90 health organizations including many NHS trusts. Only recently did I see a lot of the standard hospital name badges at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (where I train as a medical student at King’s College London) being replaced with bright and colorful #HelloMyNameIs name badges. Although it may sound simple, the impact on the patient experience is phenomenal.



A Tribute to our Unknown Soldiers

Group_Arlington_2015One of the highlights of our Telluride East Patient Safety Summer Camp each year is our trip to Arlington National Cemetery. The cemetery serves as a burial-place for “laying our Nation’s veterans and their family members to rest with dignity and honor.” Numerous daily honors remind visitors of the service, sacrifice and valor displayed by those in the military protecting our freedoms.

Again this year, our group hiked up the hill and to a spot just beneath Robert E. Lee’s House where Rosemary Gibson provided a touching “eulogy” on the history of the cemetery and lives lost due to preventable medical harm. She concluded by asking all of us to share the name of a patient or family member we knew who died from a medical error so we could all remember them…many names were shared and honored.

Arlington_Graves_GreenWhiteAs we stood on the  hill at the end of the ceremony reflecting on those lost to medical error along with those who gave their lives for our country, we looked out upon the white gravestones that could be seen in all directions. Gravestones that seemed to go on forever. The informational brochure says the cemetery is currently the final resting place for more than 400,000 people.

The irony of the 400,000 laid to rest in Arlington hits me each year, as this is the same number of patients who die every year due to preventable medical errors according to an article published in September 2013, A New Evidenced-based Estimate of Patient Harms Associated with Hospital Care in The Journal of Patient Safety. All the white tombstones that stretched to the end of the landscape and seemed to go on forever also represented the same number of patients who die each year from preventable medical harm. We fill an Arlington Cemetery every year.

Unknown_SoldierAfter our collective remembrance of those we knew who gave their lives to medical errors, I broke from our group and walked over to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. As I walked up to the white marble sarcophagus, it was easy to see the words inscribed on the back:

Here rests in honored glory an American soldier known but to God.

Wanting to know more, I began reading additional information I found at the Tomb…

On Memorial Day, 1921, four unknowns were exhumed from four World War I American cemeteries in France. U.S. Army Sgt. Edward F. Younger, who was wounded in combat, highly decorated for valor and received the Distinguished Service Medal in “The Great War, the war to end all wars,” selected the Unknown Soldier of World War I from four identical caskets at the city hall in Chalons-sur-Marne, France, Oct. 24, 1921. Sgt. Younger selected the unknown by placing a spray of white roses on one of the caskets. He chose the third casket from the left. The chosen unknown soldier was transported to the United States aboard the USS Olympia. Those remaining were interred in the Meuse Argonne Cemetery, France.

The Tomb sarcophagus was placed above the grave of the Unknown Soldier of World War I. West of the World War I Unknown are the crypts of unknowns from World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Those three graves are marked with white marble slabs flush with the plaza.

Maybe it was because I had just seen David Classen at our Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp in Colorado, but at the exact moment I finished reading the pamphlet my mind flashed to his global trigger paper that concluded adverse events and deaths from medical errors may be ten times greater than what is reported. [See‘Global trigger tool’ shows that adverse events in hospitals may be ten times greater than previously measured Health Aff (Millwood). 2011 Apr;30(4):581-9. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0190. Classen DC et al]

Standing in front of that Tomb, I couldn’t help but think that each of those unreported adverse events and medical error deaths that Classen and colleagues are referring to are the unknown soldiers of healthcare. In our own Telluride East ceremony at Arlington the last three years, we have paid tribute to those we knew had been lost to medical harm, but we failed to remember our own unknown soldiers. They say that what is seen cannot be unseen. What is felt or experienced first hand, or even vicariously through the experience of others, also leaves a lasting impact. Knowledge of the magnitude of our losses due to harm through study, along with the sharing of their stories firsthand through family members at Telluride ensures that next year, we will make sure to also remember the unknown soldiers of our own.

Reflections by A Young Physician Inspired by Telluride Experience

OVer_the_RockiesFor the last six years, health science students and resident physicians have inspired our Academy for Emerging Leaders in Patient Safety faculty as much as they report we have inspired them to become patient safety leaders within their medical centers. Each year, our faculty receive numerous emails sharing the safety projects they have been leading to make care safer for their patients. We hear about how the Telluride Experience has re-focused their purpose within medicine, sometimes even keeping them engaged at a pivotal point in their own careers when the burden of the current culture of medicine seems too much to bear. Bringing close to two hundred passionate and committed learners and future healthcare leaders to Colorado, Maryland and California each summer to work with our faculty from around the world is what keeps me excited and wanting to come back each year.

This post was inspired by the following reflection, Email I sent to my program leaders, posted on our Telluride Blog by Joy Solano, MD-PGY1. Thank you Joy! And thanks to all our Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp Alumni (close to 500 strong now) for working to make healthcare safer for our patients, families and our caregivers.

Email I sent to my program leaders.  |


I want to begin by saying THANK YOU for sending me to Telluride to learn from some of the nation’s pioneer leaders in patient safety and quality improvement. I have been so moved that I want this to be my “niche” in medicine as I continue on to become a pediatric hospitalist. I am hoping at some point to sit down with all of you to discuss the processes CMH has in place to reduce error and at the same time acknowledge human factors. I have not yet made it to error prevention training due to scheduling conflicts, but I am excited CMH is taking this step towards becoming a high reliability organization. Nick Clark (a previous Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp alum) has done a great job of incorporating patient safety moments into many of the meetings he has led, and I hope to carry this forward in some way.

We watched a variety of videos and heard multiple stories of near-misses and unfortunately, preventable patient morbidity and death. Carol, one of the representatives from the patient perspective, shared the powerful story of the loss of her daughter who had been diagnosed with leukemia 9 days before she died from a hospital acquired (and too late recognized) C. diff. infection. A C. diff. infection! This year has been particularly hard for Carol and her family as her daughter would have gone to senior prom this previous April and then graduated from high school in May.

In order not to make this email too long, I want to just make 2 more points and then, hopefully, I can discuss my thoughts with all of you in John_Nance2person at some point.

1) John Nance, writer of “Why Hospitals Should Fly,” said during his talk: “You have been trained to be the center of your own universe.” I do feel as if I was trained in medical school to practice “independently.” On rounds as students and many times as residents, we are expected to diagnose a patient (even if we are completely wrong), come up with a firm plan…and then present it confidently. Our goal is for everyone around us to nod their heads in agreement with the plan we have made. We hope no additional input is needed. However, this erases the team-based approach to medicine we MUST have in place in order to create the most safe environment for our patients. Our plans may be acceptable plans, but others’ ideas should be elicited EVERY time and considered EVERY time, so that we can ensure we have considered all options.

2) I want to begin my own QI project, but I’ll need a mentor. I just don’t know yet what I want to focus on. Sometimes it’s better when I write or talk about my interests or concerns, and then a person outside of my head points out the obvious to me. I appreciate all thoughts any of you have to offer.


Joy Solano, MD PGY-1

Remembering Mr. Farrell and Other Fathers We Have Lost


As we reflect on our continued commitment to eliminating preventable medical harm, it is important to never forget the lost loved ones that help keep us focused on our important mission. On this Father’s Day, as a proud parent and even prouder grandparent, I can’t help but reflect back this morning to last year’s Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camp and the personal story Caitlin Farrell shared with all of us on Father’s Day last year. Her story is also featured this weekend on http://runningahospital.blogspot.com/  It is one story I will never forget…

Fear, Forgiveness, and Father’s Day

Published June 16, 2014 | By CFarrell

Yesterday was Father’s Day, 2014. I woke up before everyone else in my room. Rolling out of bed, I padded down the stairs and brewed a cup of much-needed coffee. Pouring my face over the steaming cup, I looked out my window to the inspiring landscape of endless white-capped mountains. This year marks the ninth Father’s Day that I have spent without my dad, but the mountains and my purpose this week made me feel as though he were standing there with me, sharing our cup of morning coffee, just as we used to.

After taking the gondola ride into Telluride, the students and faculty plunged into our work of expanding our knowledge in the field of patient safety. We watched a documentary outlining the tragic case of Lewis Blackman, a 15-year-old boy who died due to medication error, miscommunication, and assumptions made by his medical team. The film explored the errors in Lewis’s care that have become far too common in our medical system: the lack of communication between providers and families, the establishment of “tribes” within medicine who do not collaborate or communicate with one another, the lack of mindfulness of the providers, and the culture in which all of these errors were permitted to happen.

But what resonated with me the most were the feelings described by Lewis’s mother. She defined her experience as one of isolation and desperation. “We were like an island”, she said. There was no one there to listen to her concerns. Ironically, Lewis died as a result of being in the hospital, the one place where he could not get the medical care that he so desperately needed.

A pain hit my stomach as she said these words. My family also shared the feelings of isolation, uncertainty, and loss throughout my father’s stay in the hospital. After Lewis’s death, his mother was not contacted. Instead, she was sent materials about grieving and loss in the mail. After an egregious error occurred during my father’s medical care, a physician did not give us an apology, but a white rose by a nurse.

An interesting discussion arose after the film. Our faculty emphasized the need for physicians to partner with the families of the patients. This will create not only a team during the course of treatment, but will cultivate compassion, empathy, and trust in the case of a terrible event. I know that despite the growing number of “apology laws” that protect, and even mandate, physicians to apologize to families after catastrophic events, few physicians actually do apologize. This results in families feeling like the events were there fault. I can say from experience that this is a burden that you can carry with you for years to come.

As I got back to my room and put down my books, this conversation mulled in my mind. The death of my father has given me the fuel to pursue medicine and patient safety as my career. It has instilled in me passion, energy, and determination. Yet the one thing that I have not found in the nine years since my father’s death is forgiveness. Although I do not hold any one doctor or nurse responsible for the detrimental outcome in my father’s care, I have not been able to forgive the team for what happened. I have not been able to go back to that hospital. And as I sat on my beautiful bed in the mountains, I realized that I also harbored another feeling: fear. Fear of becoming a physician who does not practice mindfulness, who does not partner with my patients, who does not apologize for my mistakes. I am afraid that despite my best intentions, I will only continue the vicious cycle. A fear that I will allow my patients to feel as though they are “on an island”.

I put away my computer and got into bed. Lying awake, I took in the gravity of the day. I am so grateful to be here at Telluride among students and faculty who share my passion in patient safety. I could not have imagined a more perfect way to spend Father’s Day.



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