It is happening…a New Generation of Healthcare Professionals

TE_Napa_GroupIt is happening…and it is growing. A newer generation of caregivers – young physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other allied health professionals – are stepping up and starting to make a difference. Many of them understand and appreciate they will soon be the gatekeepers for high quality, low risk, high value patient care. They seem to be taking this responsibility seriously – more seriously than I and my older generation colleagues did at their age. They stay connected reading new information shared through social media outlets. They are doing regular literature searches for new articles on quality, safety and value. They want to learn and understand.

TE_Napa_Reception3The reflective post shared below by Rajiv Sethi is just one of many similar posts that come from our Patient Safety Summer Camps. These young learners don’t just write reflections…they take their reflections and use them to research and learn best practices related to the topic in question. They want to learn, they yearn to learn.

There are days when many of us feel we are slogging uphill, going nowhere and will never live to see the changes so badly needed in healthcare. Working with these young caregivers revitalizes the faculty, just as much as the students are energized and educated around patient safety. Spending time to both educate and learn from the young is so important to the future of healthcare, but also our future and the future of every patients.

Reflections from Day One

Published July 28, 2015 | By Rajiv Sethi

Having only been at Telluride Experience: #AELPS11 for a day, I hadn’t imagined I would have learned so much. We covered a variety of topics with important patient safety learning points. I am so grateful for the opportunity to be here and share the experience with so many motivated individuals keen to be change agents.

I wanted to focus on one of the key moments for me: The Story of Lewis Blackman (http://qsen.org/faculty-resources/videos/the-lewis-blackman-story/). We were very lucky to have Helen Haskell (Lewis Blackman’s Mother) with us and I am so grateful to her for sharing her story. So many issues were raised during the video and I was able to draw many parallels to health care in the UK. For example, the issue of reduced staffing levels on the weekend (see link). The consequences of this can be severe as was found in a study published in the BMJ, Day of week procedure and 30 day mortality for elective surgery… where patients undergoing planned surgery were more likely to die if they have their operation at the end of the week. The new plans proposed by Jeremy Hunt (Health Secretary) to increase staffing provision at the weekend in the UK are causing much controversy, recently culminating in the hashtag #IminworkJeremy (staff posting pictures of themselves at work at the weekend).

Another issue I wanted to focus on may seem rather obvious, but as a student I believe is one of the easiest things to incorporate in daily practice; the importance of health care professionals and students introducing themselves fully to patients. In the story of Lewis Blackman, there was a lack of communication and identification of the team involved in the care of Lewis. As a result his family were unaware of who best to raise issues with.

There is so much to learn from this story but I want to end reflecting on Dr Kate Granger’s hashtag #HelloMyNameIs campaign. On her blog she describes herself as a doctor and terminally ill cancer patient musing about life and death (Click here for story). She has done remarkable work in encouraging health care staff to introduce themselves to patients, with support from over 400,000 staff in over 90 health organizations including many NHS trusts. Only recently did I see a lot of the standard hospital name badges at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (where I train as a medical student at King’s College London) being replaced with bright and colorful #HelloMyNameIs name badges. Although it may sound simple, the impact on the patient experience is phenomenal.

 

 

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