Telluride Alumni and Faculty Continue to Leave Their Mark on Healthcare

As the Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps prepare to expand in 2015, adding a third session for health science students to be held in Napa, CA (and fifth summer camp week overall when we include the two weeks for resident physicians) , our alumni continue to leave a lasting mark on healthcare. Most recently, Jennifer Loeb MD, former Telluride alum and now an internal medicine resident at the University of Illinois Hospital, published her thoughts in Hospital Impact, on how the need to provide patient-centric care drives her work at the bedside. She writes:

For me, safe patient care is more than adherence to checklists and standard operating protocols. It is a consequence of an approach to treating patients that’s characterized by applying medical evidence in a patient-centric way, by ensuring that compassion enters into care decisions and by listening with purpose to a patient’s articulated needs and, often helping them identify what those needs may be. I look forward to becoming a caregiver who can bring those attributes to my patient interactions…To say that I have evolved over many years to this point may be true, but it took a personal family challenge for me to truly appreciate all that it takes to achieve safe care. It’s not easy, it’s not one thing, it’s not just being careful or diligent — rather, it’s the way we deliver care, it’s how we see our role as part of a healing process, it’s how we put “care” into the word”caregiver.”…click here to read entire article

WineWisdom_Paul_Lauren_Shelly_Resident physicians from MedStar Health and medical students from Georgetown University SOM each held gatherings of their own local Quality and Patient Safety Councils inspired by leaders who spent time in Telluride as well. The MedStar Resident QIPS Council, co-founded by alumni Shabnam Hafiz, MD, and Stephanie Wappel, MD, has grown to over 40 members and is focused on inspiring the change needed to make care safer and of the highest quality. The QIPS Council sponsored its first educational event in September at The French Embassy in Washington DC, led by QIPS Council member (and also a Telluride alumni) Lauren Lobaugh, MD, QIPS Education Committee Chair. The event, entitled “Wine and Wisdom,” was standing room only, and the guest speaker was nationally recognized safety expert (and Telluride faculty–there’s a theme here…), Paul Levy, who spoke about “the art of persuasion”.  Guests from all over the region (Univ. of Maryland, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Johns Hopkins, INOVA, Walter Reed, and more) were invited to join the Council for a cocktail hour, lecture, and small group discussions about where we are today, and where we see our healthcare communities going in the future. The event also piqued the interest of local news outlets, and a story ran in the Washington Business Journal in September. Lobaugh was quoted in the article as below, and the rest of the story can be found here:

Making a mistake that harms a patient can be shattering for a doctor, said organizer Dr. Lauren Lobaugh, a fourth-year resident in MedStar Georgetown Hospital’s anesthesiology department. Over the summer, she headed to a patient safety boot camp held in Telluride, Colorado, and said she was impacted by the idea of “caring for the caregiver” instead of “shaming and blaming” them when an error is made.

And finally, Engagingpatients.org recently asked us to comment on their blog about how our patient advocates contribute to the Telluride Experience. Our patient advocates, and their stories, are such an integral piece of the Telluride Experience, it is hard to imagine the workshops without the depth of their contributions. From the post:

The Power of Storytelling
The power of stories is called upon regularly during the Telluride Experience.  Patient and healthcare advocates continue to return as Telluride faculty to share their stories—stories that leave a lasting imprint on the hearts and minds of the alumni and faculty audience…The films are a foundational piece of the TPSSC curriculum, and in each session, they stimulate emotional conversations around what was missed, how to avoid future similar harm, and the hidden curriculum of medicine…

The Human Side of Medicine
When Helen or the Skolniks lead the group conversation after the film, an additional element is added to the learning. Young medical students who have yet to even see this side of medicine are exposed in vivo to the impact their future decisions will have on the kind, loving people before them. The patient becomes more than a procedure, and the audience realizes first-hand just how human both patients and healthcare professionals are. Time and time again, we have seen how these stories change people in the moment…
For more, go to EngagingPatients.org

Applications for the 2015 Telluride Patient Safety Summer Camps will soon be announced open. Thanks once again to the generous and continued support of our sponsors–The Doctors Company Foundation, COPIC, and CIR–our patient safety army continues to gain reinforcements in hospitals and in medical/nursing schools across the country with now over 400 alumni scholars making patient safety contagious. For more information, go to www.telluridesummercamp.com.

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