Resident Reflections from Telluride 2013 #TPSER9

IMG_7727Having just returned from Telluride, I can share that the future of medicine looks extremely bright. Twenty-eight residents, all extremely passionate about patient safety, patient-centered care, shared decision-making and righting the wrongs they see in healthcare, have all promised to tell 10 colleagues about the empowering cultural messages shared in Telluride. They will then ask those 10 colleagues to share the lessons learned with 10 more, and so on…

As Telluride organizers Dave Mayer and Tim McDonald say, they will pay it forward.

Following are just a few of those messages in excerpts from resident reflections on the Transparent Health blog. All post can be found here.

From Dr. Kerrie Bossard — The opportunity that I see after completing this exercise is that although we can all make small incremental changes in our respective practices, how can we reshape the practice of medicine to make our small individual changes part of a bigger and more permanent cultural change? If all 28 of the scholars would communicate with 10 colleagues about the importance of shared decision-making and informed consent we could make a small change. But if we made our goals for next week bigger and decided to change the entire process for all residents for generations to come, we may succeed in making lasting change and forever changing the practice of medicine related to these issues…(continued here)

From Dr. Shabnam Hafiz — What an incredible week! I have been so fortunate to be surrounded by such a brilliant group of people leading change all over the country. You have all inspired me and energized me to go back and promote the mission that we have all set out for ourselves- create a system that is patient first… (continued here)

From Dr. Michelle Espinoza —today’s experience was life changing…To be here in Telluride is truly a blessing, and to be surrounded by such knowledge, talent, wisdom and passion is AMAZING…Today I learned that I am not alone in thinking our hospitals are one of the most dangerous places for patients. That my internal conflict regarding my concerns for residency training is not isolated to my hospital, and that there are people who not only believe this is wrong, but have dedicated their lives to making a change…(continued here)

From Dr. Lauren Sontag — Shabs recent post, How Can We Teach, regarding her QI project standardizing an appropriate informed consent discussion. She says several times that we need to put “patients first.” It warms me from within to hear this; I was already going to put up a little post about that very idea. I had the great fortune to go to medical school at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, and the most important thing I learned there was this philosophy: the needs of the patient come first. When we believe this and act upon it, we have the courage to address problem behaviors among our peers (and even our attendings and consultants!). We find the moment to sit down instead of hovering near the exam room door and we don’t accept the status quo. Consider it as a mantra for yourself and something you teach others!

From Dr. Stephanie Wappel — …It is so easy to become jaded in medicine, especially as a resident, and this is exactly what I needed at this point in my life to reinforce why I went into medicine in the first place: for the patient.  I’m making a personal commitment to myself and to everyone here at TSRC that I am taking this home and will implement more patient safety measures and quality improvement at my home program…I am going to start with resident education because I feel like this is the greatest need at present. We can each make a difference as long as we keep our eye on the common goal which is the health and safety of the patient…(continued here)

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